Monday, August 19, 2019

NGC 6946 The 'Fireworks' Galaxy


NGC 6946 is a spiral galaxy separated by less than 1 degree from the beautiful open cluster NGC 6939. Often referred to as the "firecracker" galaxy because of the large number of supernova (9) that have occurred in this galaxy since 1917. 

Optics: Vixen ED81s @ f/5.2
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Synscan Pro
Guiding: SBIG ST2000XM ST4
Camera: SBIG ST2000XM
Filter Wheel: SBIG CFW9
Filters: L
CCD Temperature: 0 degrees Celsius
Constellation: Cygnus
Date: Aug 4, 2019
Location: Albireo Observatory I - Korinthos, Greece
Exposure: L=24x5 min bin 1x1
Calibration: Darks, Flats, Bias

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

NGC 6910


NGC 6910 is an open cluster in the constellation Cygnus. It was discovered by William Herschel on October 17, 1786. The cluster was also observed by John Herschel on September 18, 1828. NGC 6910 is located half a degree east-north east of Gamma Cygni, also known as Sadr. It may be physically related with the nebula IC 1318, which is also known as the Gamma Cygni nebula complex and lies at a similar distance, behind the galactic Great Rift.

Optics: Vixen VC200L @ f/6.4
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Synscan Pro
Guiding: 9x50 finderscope, DMK21AU04, PHD2 guiding
Camera: SBIG ST2000XM
Filter Wheel: SBIG CFW9
Filters: L,R,G,B,Ha
CCD Temperature: 0 degrees Celsius
Constellation: Cygnus
Date: July 26/27, 2019
Location: Albireo Observatory I - Korinthos, Greece
Exposure: L:R:G:B:Ha=60:60:60:60:60 min bin 1x1
Calibration: Darks, Flats, Bias

Sunday, July 28, 2019

The Cygnus Wall Complex



Sometimes, stars form in walls -- bright walls of interstellar gas. In this vivid skyscape, stars are forming in the W-shaped ridge of emission known as the Cygnus Wall. Part of a larger emission nebula with a distinctive outline popularly called The North America Nebula, the cosmic ridge spans about 20 light-years. 

Optics: Vixen ED81s @ f/5.2
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Synscan Pro
Guiding: 9x50 finderscope, DMK21AU04, PHD2 guiding
Camera: SBIG ST2000XM
Filter Wheel: SBIG CFW9
Filters: L,R,G,B,Ha
CCD Temperature: 0 degrees Celsius
Constellation: Cygnus
Date: July 19/20, 2019
Location: Albireo Observatory I - Korinthos, Greece
Exposure: L:R:G:B:Ha=60:40:40:40:175 min bin 1x1
Calibration: Darks, Flats, Bias


M29


M29 is a small packet of 80 stars contained in a tiny 10' sphere of sky. It lies in a dense region of Milky Way that runs the length of the celestial Swan (Cygnus) - a region laced with dark lanes of interstellar dust. It would be no doubt be a more striking sight were it not for the dense obscuring matter that veils the region.

Optics: VixenVC200L @ f/6.4
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 Synscan Pro
Guiding: 9x50 finderscope, DMK21AU04, PHD2 guiding
Camera: SBIG ST2000XM
Filter Wheel: SBIG CFW9
Filters: L,R,G,B,Ha
CCD Temperature: 0 degrees Celsius
Constellation: Cygnus
Date: July 5/6, 2019
Location: Albireo Observatory I - Korinthos, Greece
Exposure: L:R:G:B:Ha=30:30:30:30:150 min bin 1x1
Calibration: Darks, Flats, Bias



M16 the Eagle Nebula


A star cluster around 2 million years young surrounded by natal clouds of dust and glowing gas, M16 is also known as The Eagle Nebula. This beautifully detailed image of the region includes cosmic sculptures made famous in Hubble Space Telescope close-ups of the starforming complex. Described as elephant trunks or Pillars of Creation, dense, dusty columns rising near the center are light-years in length but are gravitationally contracting to form stars. Energetic radiation from the cluster stars erodes material near the tips, eventually exposing the embedded new stars. Extending from the ridge of bright emission left of center is another dusty starforming column known as the Fairy of Eagle Nebula. M16 and the Eagle Nebula lie about 7,000 light-years away, an easy target for binoculars or small telescopes in a nebula rich part of the sky toward the split constellation Serpens Cauda (the tail of the snake).

Optics: Vixen ED81s @ f/7.7
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 synscan Pro
Guiding: 9x50 finderscope, DMK21AU04, PHD guiding
Camera: SBIG ST2000XM
Filter Wheel: SBIG CFW9
Filters: Ha
CCD Temperature: 0 degrees Celsius
Constellation: Serpens
Date: June 29, 2019
Location: Korinthos - Greece - Albireo Observatory
Exposure
Ha=4x30min bin 1x1
Calibration: Darks, Flats, Bias

Monday, July 1, 2019

M8 - Lagoon Nebula



Very conspicuous to the naked eye, M8 appears as a large curdle of galactic vapor off the western edge of the Milky Way that rises from the teapot's spout. The emission nebula, powered by the radiative energy of the very hot 6th-magnitude star 9 Sagittarii, 9th-magnitude Herschel 36, and possibly some obscured stars, is complemented on its eastern side by NGC 6530 - a loose spritz of 113 very young suns, all of which are probably intimately associated with the M8 nebulosity that enshrouds them in loops and swirls.

Optics: Vixen ED81s @ f/7.7
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 synscan Pro
Guiding: 9x50 finderscope, DMK21AU04, PHD guiding
Camera: SBIG ST2000XM
Filter Wheel: SBIG CFW9
Filters: L,R,G,B,Ha
CCD Temperature: 0 degrees Celsius
Constellation: Sagittarius
Date: June 28, 2019
Location: Parnonas mountain - Greece
Exposure
L:R:G:B:Ha=120:30:30:30:15 min bin 1x1
Calibration: Darks, Flats, Bias





Wednesday, June 26, 2019

M92 Globular Cluster



Located 27,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Hercules, this globular cluster — a ball of stars that orbits our galaxy’s core like a satellite — was first discovered by the German astronomer Johann Elert Bode in 1777. With an apparent magnitude of 6.3, M92 is one of the brightest globular clusters in the Milky Way and is visible to the naked eye under good observing conditions. It can be most easily spotted during the month of July. The cluster is very tightly packed with stars, containing roughly 330,000 stars in total.

Optics: Vixen VC200L @ f/6.4
Mount: Skywatcher HEQ5 synscan Pro
Guiding: SBIG ST2000XM ST4
Camera: SBIG ST2000XM
Filter Wheel: SBIG CFW9
Filters: L,R,G,B
CCD Temperature: 0 degrees Celsius
Constellation: Hercules
Date: June 23, 2019
Location: Korinthos - Greece - Albireo Observatory
Exposure
L:R:G:B=50:20:20:20 min bin 1x1